Fighting Corruption

Anti-Corruption Training for Prosecutors, Investigators & Judges

The CEELI Institute is a recognized leader in the design and delivery of innovative regional anti-corruption training programs. Since 2013, the Institute has regularly conducted its core curricula on “Investigating and Prosecuting Official Corruption,” as well as a variety of other programs addressing various aspects of corruption investigations and prosecutions. The Institute’s core course is designed to be highly interactive, using a case based curriculum approach, and bringing together as faculty members some of the world’s most experienced anti-corruption prosecutors and forensic Anti-Corruption 2accountants. The course provides participants with a comprehensive framework for investigating and prosecuting official corruption, and feedback from participants has been exceptionally positive. The course is now in its third year, and has been revised annually based on faculty and participant feedback. The most recent iterations took place in April 2016 at the CEELI Institute facilities in Prague. Among recent participants were prosecutors and investigators from Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Liberia, Kenya, Moldova, Singapore, Slovakia, Serbia and Ukraine, along with a number of observers, including representatives of the Czech anti-corruption police unit, the OSCE and several U.S. Embassies.

  • Case Based, Practical Training

The CEELI Institute puts great emphasis on designing and conducting programs that use case-based, interactive curricula. In the context of anti-corruption training, this means designing programs that engage participants in the actual process of assembling and pursuing a corruption or fraud case. Using practical case scenarios as a learning tool demands that participants take an active role in the workshop. With each session, participants are presented with additional facts and legal obstacles to confront and overcome as the fact pattern becomes more complicated. Participants start with a few red flags, indicating a possible case involving corrupt activities. They work in small groups to pursue their investigation. The case studies are designed to walk participants through all aspects of an investigation – initial allegations or suspicions, preliminary inquiries, development of an investigation plan, collection and analysis of documentary materials, forensic accounting analysis, interviews of witnesses and targets, and preparation for trial or other disposition. The use of case scenarios as a teaching tool allows the participants to form close bonds as the training progresses, challenging their intellect and expanding their skills and knowledge base as they are exposed to new approaches in the investigation and prosecution of complex high level corruption cases. Case scenarios are supported by relevant faculty presentations on key topics. Faculty provide mentoring to the small groups, as well as one-on-one mentoring throughout the program.

  • International Scope

The CEELI Institute has also undertaken extensive anti-corruption training efforts in other countries and other regions of the world. For example, at present the Institute is actively engaged, in partnership with the International Legal Assistance Consortium (ILAC), and with funding from the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA), in providing support and training to the newly established Tunisian Anti-Corruption Agency (known by its French acronym, the INLUCC). The Institute is supporting INLUCC in its efforts to become the lead Tunisian body in identifying and investigating both official and commercial corruption. The CEELI Institute trainings enable INLUCC to gradually build the expertise of its staff, as well as provide instruction to representatives of other Tunisian institutions engaged in anti-corruption efforts. Programs delivered to the INLUCC include training focused on corruption detection and basic financial investigation techniques, as well as specialized curricula addressing corruption in government procurement, the conduct of elections, government licensing, and tax administration.

  • Faculty Roster

Faculty for the CEELI Institute Anti-Corruption program include some of the world’s most experienced anti-corruption prosecutors, forensic accountants and practitioners. Many are former federal prosecutors with experience working at the Fraud Section of the US Department of Justice (the office responsible for enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act) or as Assistant US Attorneys handling public corruption cases. Others have served in similar capacities with the UK Crown Prosecution Service, the UK Serious Fraud Office or with international investigative Units such as the UN Oil for Food Investigations.

Supporting the Tunisian Anti-Corruption Agency

The CEELI Institute works in partnership with the International Legal Assistance Consortium (ILAC) to provide support and training to the newly established Tunisian Anti-Corruption Agency (also known by its French acronym, the INLUCC). The Institute’s efforts are designed to support the Agency in its development and in its efforts to become a leaAnti-Corruption Agencyding body in identifying and investigating both official and commercial corruption. The CEELI Institute has provided training to enable the Agency to gradually build the expertise of its staff; the Institute has also provided instruction to representatives of other stakeholder Tunisian agencies and institutions engaged in anti-corruption efforts. The CEELI Institute’s assistance is intended to help INLUCC to establish itself as the lead coordinator of the Tunisian government’s anti-corruption efforts. Apart from INLUCC staff, participants of the trainings come from a wide range of Tunisian agencies with anti-corruption responsibilities, including the Central Bank, the Finance Ministry and the Ministry of Interior. This program is funded by the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA)

In 2016, the INLUCC has welcomed a new INLUCC director, Chawki Tabib, a lawyer and former head of the Tunisian Bar Association. He replaced its founding director, prominent veteran Tunisian human rights lawyer Samir Annabi.

The CEELI Institute has worked closely with the agency to continue to develop highly specialized training sessions based on INLUCC’s stated priorities. Among the programs delivered by the Institute are training focused on corruption detection and basic financial investigation techniques; a training session on financial and banking sector fraud; a session on fraud in securing government permits and licenses; a session on corruption and fraud in public procurements; and a training session on electoral fraud and misuse of state finances in election campaigns (in partnership with the International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES). CEELI has also partnered with the International Association of Women Judges (IAWJ) to deliver a course on the gender aspects of corruption and, in particular, on “sextortion” – requesting sexual favors as a form of abuse of power and corruption.

We have also included Tunisian participants selected by INLUCC at the Institute’s anti-corruption programming in Prague.