Tunisia: Workshop on Corruption in Tax Administration 

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2016-11-03-at-12-05-25The CEELI Institute has returned to Tunisia on November 2-3 to organize another workshop in cooperation with the Tunisian Anti-Corruption Agency (INLUCC), this time focused on detecting and investigating corruption in the tax area. Close to forty participants from the INLUCC and a range of other government bodies, including government auditors, tax departments, accountants, lawyers and judges met to discuss the issue in Tunis.

The session was led by veteran Canadian prosecutor John Pearson, together with Tunisian magistrate Mohamed Ayadi.

CEELI takes on “Sextortion”

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The CEELI Institute has partnered with the International Association of Women Judges (IAWJ) to deliver a two-day interactive session focused on gender aspects of corruption and, in particular, on “sextortion” – requesting sexual favors as a form of abuse of power and corruption. While typically unreported and not as visible and media-attractive as large-scale financial corruption, sexually motivated abuse of power brings just as serious damage to people’s lives and dignity.

The workshop, led by experienced trainers Nancy Hendry, Judge Mary Davis, and Tunisian Judge Mariem Sassi, was organized for the Tunisian Anti-Corruption Authority (INLUCC).

Thirty participants, including judges, INLUCC investigators, journalists, and civil society representatives took part in the session, organized on October 4-5 in Tunis.

INLUCC President Chawki Tabib delivered opening remarks, outlining the importance of women participating in the fight against corruption – from reporting sextortion to overcoming the existing constraints to come forward as whistleblowers.

Tunisia: Training on Corruption Investigations in the Area of Permits and Licenses

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b9ea8a5a-b203-4c6d-8364-a2050e2416beIn April 2016, the CEELI Institute delivered another of its series of anti-corruption trainings organized for Tunisian stakeholders in cooperation with the Tunisian National Anti-Corruption Agency (INLUCC). The session focused on detecting corruption and fraud in the issuance of government permits and licenses. Once again, we were able to secure outstanding international faculty for the program. Dan Newcomb is the founder of the Anti-Corruption group at the global law firm Shearman & Sterling, and has participated in numerous high-profile cases, including the investigation into the marketing practices of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, which was a precursor to the enactment of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Helge Kvamme is a partner with Selmer, a Norwegian Law Firm, and is a former head of PwC Forensics and Anti-Corruption Services in Norway, where he gained extensive experience with economic crime investigations and Anti-Corruption services.

The highly interactive training was based on a hypothetical case of corruption in issuing a license for a telecommunications company, and included sample invoices, news reports, witness testimonies, internal communications and bank transfer documents that the participants, working in groups, needed to piece together into a case to present to a hypothetical prosecution. The thirty Tunisian participants at the training included representatives of INLUCC, as well as of a broad array of relevant Tunisian institutions, including government regulators and lawyers.

Tunisia: Training on Corruption Investigations in the Area of Permits and Licenses

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TunisiaOn April 12-13, the CEELI Institute delivered another of its series of trainings organized in collaboration with the Tunisian National Anti-Corruption Agency (INLUCC). The session focused on detecting corruption and fraud in the area of issuing government permits and licenses, and was led by two prominent experts. Dan Newcomb is the founder of the Anti-Corruption group at the leading global law firm Shearman & Sterling, and has participated in numerous high-profile cases, including the investigation into the marketing practices of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation for the Special Review Committee of its board of directors, which was a precursor to the enactment of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Helge Kvamme is a partner with the Norwegian Law Firm Selmer and formerly the head of PwC Forensics and Anti-Corruption Services in Norway with extensive experience with economic crime investigations, and Anti-Corruption services.

The highly interactive training was based on a hypothetical case of corruption in issuing a licence for a telecommunications company and included sample invoices, news reports, witness testimonies, internal communications, and bank transfer documents that the participants, working in groups, needed to piece together into a case to present to a hypothetical prosecution. Invited by INLUCC, the 30 participants at the training were representatives of a broad array of Tunisian institutions, government regulators, and lawyers.

Tunisia: CEELI Institute Begins Program to Build Public Trust in the Judiciary

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The CEELI Institute recently started the second phase of its judicial program in Tunisia, designed to work with a select group of judges, on an effort to build and promote public trust in the judiciary. In partnership with the Tunisian Ministry of Justice, and in cooperation with the Swedish–based International Legal Assistance Consortium, the initial session brought together twelve highly experienced Tunisian judges who have previously worked with CEELI on other judicial projects. The program addresses problems created for judges in Tunisia by the continuing lack of public trust in state institutions, a lingering legacy left of the Ben Ali era. The topic was identified by the judges themselves, as well as by other relevant stakeholders, during our needs assessment following the initial phase of the project.  Judges often have difficulty dealing with the intense media scrutiny, which distorts the picture of what is really going on in the courtroom. The program aims to encourage the judges to develop tools to effectively communicate and interact with both the public and the media. Participating judges are provided with an opportunity to discuss relevant issues in a constructive setting among themselves as well as with representatives of other sectors, including the non-governmental sector and media.  Four such sessions will be organized in spring 2016, bringing together close to 50 Tunisian judges from various regions of the country.