Spring Anti-Corruption Training at the CEELI Institute

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In late April, the CEELI Institute again conducted its program on “Investigating and Prosecuting Official Corruption.” As with the previous sessions, the five-day interactive program brought together an extraordinary faculty line-up consisting of some of the world’s foremost anti-corruption prosecutors, forensic accountants, and practitioners including Jean-Michel Ferat, a US forensic accountant and Managing Director of Claro Group, David Hawkes, a German senior prosecutor and head of the Special Litigation Unit in the World Bank Group’s Integrity Vice Presidency (IVP), Pamela Parizek, Partner at KPMG in Washington D.C., Bruno Cova, Chair of the Milan Office of the law firm of Paul Hastings, and Susan Ringler, Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer for a Fortune 100 company. Together, this esteemed faculty provided participants with a comprehensive framework for investigating and prosecuting official corruption.

Training on Investigation and Prosecution of Official Corruption, April 25-29, 2016

Training on Investigation and Prosecution of Official Corruption, April 25-29, 2016

The program’s participants included prosecutors, investigators, and NGO representatives from six countries including Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kenya, Serbia, and Tunisia as well as a number of observers including representatives from the OSCE and from US embassies from across the Balkan region. The CEELI Institute puts great emphasis on designing and conducting programs that use case-based, interactive curricula that use realistic case scenarios as learning tools.

Participants worked throughout the week in small groups to develop their own investigation strategy, learning to use time-tested investigative tools along the way, and ultimately making a recommendation to the larger conference on whether theirs was a case they would pursue to prosecution or not. Building on each previous session, participants were presented with additional facts, documents, information, and legal obstacles each day that they had to confront and overcome as the evidence and scenario became more and more complicated. The course is designed to develop and improve practical investigation skills as the participants pursue a resolution to their case, augmented by expert guidance and instruction. The case scenario is supported by relevant faculty presentations on key topics and the faculty provided mentoring to the small groups, as well as to individual participants throughout the program.

Bolstering Counterterrorism Adjudication in the Balkans and Beyond

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The CEELI Institute recently began a multi-year program that will engage judges handling complex cases involving issues of terrorism and national security, including the increasingly serious threats posed in Europe by the transit of foreign fighters. In particular, the program aims to promote understanding and use of relevant international “good practices” fCT Strategy Sessionor judges on these matters, including particularly the Global Counterterrorism Forum’s (GCTF) Hague Memorandum Good Practices for the Judiciary in Adjudicating Terrorism Offenses. The program effort is being undertaken in partnership with the Malta-based International Institute for Justice and the Rule of Law (IIJ) and with funding from the US State Department. Participating judges will be drawn primarily from the Western Balkans and Middle East/North Africa (MENA) regions.

In light of the increased terrorism across Europe, the vast transit of refugees to Europe from Syria, the continuing conflicts in Syria and Iraq, and the particular burdens this puts on both the Balkan countries and countries throughout MENA, the issues encompassed by the GCTF Good Practice documents are more important than ever. Judges across the region will benefit from greater training and preparation on how to handle cases involving both domestic terrorism and the new phenomenon presented by foreign fighters.

The initial sessions are being conducted at the CEELI Institute facility in Prague, and include an intensive 3-day workshop that aims to familiarize the judges with the “Good Practice” documents and expand on their meanings, implications, and relevance to cases the judges might find themselves presiding over in the near future. Workshops will be regionally specific and the Institute intends on training no fewer than 80 judges over the course of this project. International experts from both Europe and the United States will be engaged throughout the project to help create a thorough, yet understandable curricula that will help participant judges gain a solid understanding of relevant best practices and how to incorporate them into their future work.